Atlanta season 3 is meandering, implosive and weird — and we need more TV like it

The latest season of Atlanta is weird. That may sound like stating the obvious. Atlanta is supposed to be weird. Its first two seasons, which aired in 2016 and 2018, established it as exceptionally inventive, unpredictable and adventurous television. And the weirdness is not the only thing, of course. Atlanta would have been essential viewing … Continue reading Atlanta season 3 is meandering, implosive and weird — and we need more TV like it

Firenadoes, koala denialism and hanging loose: Australia’s apocalyptic bushfires prove Don’t Look Up isn’t exaggerating

This is intended as a companion piece to my recent essay about Don’t Look Up. It was originally meant to be a section of that essay, made up of no more than a few paragraphs, but as I wrote, it kept expanding. Eventually I realized I had so much to say about the bushfires here … Continue reading Firenadoes, koala denialism and hanging loose: Australia’s apocalyptic bushfires prove Don’t Look Up isn’t exaggerating

Tame Impala’s Currents: A contemporary classic of epic, obsessive psychedelic pop

This essay is adapted from a presentation I gave at our Classic Album Sundays Sydney listening party celebrating Tame Impala’s Currents earlier this month. I’ve included a playlist, embedded below. There’s a paradox at the heart of the massive appeal of Tame Impala’s third album: it’s without a doubt a pop album, a conscious effort … Continue reading Tame Impala’s Currents: A contemporary classic of epic, obsessive psychedelic pop

Bright Lights by Susanna Hoffs: A collection of warm, intimate, impeccably chosen covers

Bright Lights, the new album by Susanna Hoffs, and her first in nine years, is an unexpected treat for me. Its release — on Hoffs’ own label, Baroque Folk — was only announced a few weeks ago. From what I can gather from interviews and from Hoffs’ social media, she experienced some frustration in getting … Continue reading Bright Lights by Susanna Hoffs: A collection of warm, intimate, impeccably chosen covers

Marvel’s What If…?: Disposable by design, intermittently powerful, ultimately frustrating

Comic books are disposable entertainment by definition. They started out as stories for kids printed on cheap pulp, serialized in weekly, easy-to-digest installments. A century later, the paper stock might be nicer, the budgets for creative talent higher, and the storytelling far more sophisticated, but this disposability remains inherent to the medium. This is not … Continue reading Marvel’s What If…?: Disposable by design, intermittently powerful, ultimately frustrating